Radical action for more gender equality in Antarctic science

Antarctica is not a man’s world - not anymore. Women have played an important role in the advancement of Antarctic science especially in the last 50 years. An on-line collection of biographies of successful female scientists who worked in Antarctica celebrates that. Hopes are that the carriers of these women will inspire young girls to follow in their footsteps.

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Grey whales in Russian Far East slowly recovering

The critically endangered western gray whale population that feeds in Russia's Far East waters is slowly showing signs of recovery, but their numbers and range are still at risk from industry activity in the region, according to a new report. Over the last 12 years, Sakhalin Energy has made important efforts to limit the impact of its operations on whales and the fragile environment. During this period, the western gray whale population has grown 3-4% annually, from an estimated 115 animals in 2004 to 174 in 2015.

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Franklins long lost HMS Terror found in the Northwest Passage

When Sir John Franklin and his 128 men vanished without a trace in the Canadian Arctic in 1845, it led to the biggest and longest search and rescue missions in the history of polar exploration. More than 50 years, numerous ships and explorers made their way into the high north to look for the expedition and simultaneously for a passage through the Canadian Archipelago. The passage eventually was found, but the expedition and its two ships remained lost for almost two centuries. Until 2014, when the HMS Erebus, Franklin’s flag ship was found. Now, another search party also found the second ship, HMS Terror… almost 100 km south of its presumed sinking spot and perfectly intact.

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ICE AGE movie characters experience winter at Scott Base in Antarctica

What are a sloth and a weasel doing in Antarctica? The two costume characters of the current ICE AGE movie “Collision Course” are in Antarctica to help 5-12 year olds to understand Antarctica and its relationship to climate change. Antarctica New Zealand and 20th Century Fox NZ are collaborating to create a video series that teaches young New Zealanders about the icy continent.

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Do it yourself – Canadian Inuit community takes steps against climate change

Energy for communities in the Canadian High Arctic always is relying on external supplies mostly by ship. Despite less ice along the eastern coast and the early opening of the Northwest Passage which makes it easier for supply ships to reach the remote communities in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, it still is a difficult and especially costly affair. Ironically, as the communities will receive oil and diesel for energy production, they add to the climate change by burning fossil fuels. Clyde River will now go a different way.

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Communication beyond 81 North will improve

Today, maintaining communications coverage north of Svalbard is a great challenge, but a new Norwegian research project promises a groundbreaking solution for far-north Arctic areas.

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First sunrise and start of winter flights at New Zealand’s Antarctic Scott Base

A phenomena normal for thousands of people is celebrated in Antarctica: The first sunrise after months of darkness. The return of the light is also the start for an important Antarctic summer season for New Zealand as it signifies 60-years since the construction of Sir Edmund Hillary’s Trans-Antarctic Expedition Hut, the original Scott Base.

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Melting ice sheet could expose frozen Cold War-era waste

Climate change is threatening to expose hazardous waste at an abandoned camp thought to be buried forever in the Greenland Ice Sheet, new research has found. Camp Century, a United States military base built within the Greenland ice sheet in 1959, doubled as a top-secret site for testing the feasibility of deploying nuclear missiles during the Cold War. When the camp was decommissioned in 1967, its infrastructure and waste were abandoned

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Antarctic sea ice may be a mercury source in the food web

New research has found methylmercury -- a potent neurotoxin - in sea ice in the Southern Ocean. The results are the first to show that sea-ice bacteria can change mercury into methylmercury, a more toxic form that can contaminate the marine environment, including fish and birds.

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Last mammoths on Alaskan island went extinct due to lack of water

A remnant population of woolly mammoths on a remote Alaska island was likely pushed to extinction by rising sea levels and a lack of access to fresh water, according to a newly published study.

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