Ancestral bear discovered in Canadian High Arctic

Researchers from the Canadian Museum of Nature and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have identified remains of a 3.5-million-year-old bear from a fossil-rich site in Canada's High Arctic. Their study shows not only that the animal is a close relative of the ancestor of modern bears -- tracing its ancestry to extinct bears of similar age from East Asia -- but that it also had a sweet tooth, as determined by cavities in the teeth.

Read more ...

POLARNEWS WISHES A HAPPY NEW YEAR AND ALL THE BEST FOR 2018!!

POLARNEWS WISHES A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR

Read more ...

Narwhals both freeze and flee while escaping

Narwhals are very elusive and mysterious marine mammals. Scientists only know little about their lifestyles and behaviors due to their geographical range. As true ice loving mammals, narwhals spend most of their time around the edge of the Arctic pack ice. Only in certain times, they swim along shorelines. Now, a team of researchers has found an astonishing and seemingly contradictive behavior. When escaping from humans, narwhals don’t just freeze or flee. They do both.

Read more ...

Last round for South Georgia’s rat eradication program

Since 2011, the largest eradication program against invasive species takes place on the Subantarctic island of South Georgia. Thousands of square kilometers had been baited in an attempt to get rid of rats and mice, which had caused massive havoc among the bird population. Now, the program steps into its final phase with surveying the island for traces of any remaining rodents. With any luck, the island soon will be declared rodent-free.

Read more ...

Microbial globetrotters live in the Arctic and Antarctic

Microbes, second round: Although the Arctic and Antarctic regions are at opposite ends of Earth, they have a similar diversity of bacteria and other microscopic life. These are the findings of an international team of researchers headed by the University of Tübingen, the EMBL Heidelberg and the University of Konstanz. In their study, the team collated data from numerous studies and locations in order to make a direct comparison of the microbial diversity in these two distant regions for the first time.

Read more ...

Antarctic Microbes live off Antarctic air

Life in Antarctica consists of more than penguins and seals. A rich microbial community exists on the ice, the fresh water ponds and in the soil. However, it was unclear how these organisms thrive in their habitat. Now, a team of scientists led by the University of New South Wales Sydney has discovered that microbes have a previously unknown ability to scavenge trace gases from the air to stay alive in these extreme conditions.

Read more ...

Moulting bowhead whales in Nunavut

Bowhead whales are one of the most elusive and mysterious whale species in the Arctic, despite its size. Hunted almost to extinction, these huge baleen whales have made a tremendous comeback and are found now in many Arctic areas close to the ice edge. Now, researcher from the University of British Columbia have found a new and surprising behavior of bowheads in Nunavut, Canada.

Read more ...

Happy Birthday, Australian Antarctic Program!

Seventy years ago on November 28, the maiden expedition of Australia’s Antarctic Program set sail from Western Australia, establishing the first of the nation’s research stations in the polar region. Nowadays, Australia is considered a key player in Antarctic affairs and holds the largest segment of Antarctica.

Read more ...

Extinct giant sea cow found in Russian Arctic

Russian scientists found an immense extinct sea mammal buried in grounds of the country’s eastern coastline. The nature ministry announced that the remains are still intact and that this is an excellent finding due to the history of this species.

Read more ...

Waking up the Antarctic princess

The Belgian Antarctic station Princess Elisabeth Antarctica is one of the latest and most advanced stations. During summer season up to 16 researchers can be housed at the station, which is situated in Queen Maud Land, East Antarctica. The station is a summer station and thus, closed for the winter and maintained automatically from Belgium thanks to a sophisticated control system. Now, the station has been manned and reopened for the season.

Read more ...