ICE AGE movie characters experience winter at Scott Base in Antarctica

What are a sloth and a weasel doing in Antarctica? The two costume characters of the current ICE AGE movie “Collision Course” are in Antarctica to help 5-12 year olds to understand Antarctica and its relationship to climate change. Antarctica New Zealand and 20th Century Fox NZ are collaborating to create a video series that teaches young New Zealanders about the icy continent.

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Do it yourself – Canadian Inuit community takes steps against climate change

Energy for communities in the Canadian High Arctic always is relying on external supplies mostly by ship. Despite less ice along the eastern coast and the early opening of the Northwest Passage which makes it easier for supply ships to reach the remote communities in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, it still is a difficult and especially costly affair. Ironically, as the communities will receive oil and diesel for energy production, they add to the climate change by burning fossil fuels. Clyde River will now go a different way.

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Communication beyond 81 North will improve

Today, maintaining communications coverage north of Svalbard is a great challenge, but a new Norwegian research project promises a groundbreaking solution for far-north Arctic areas.

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First sunrise and start of winter flights at New Zealand’s Antarctic Scott Base

A phenomena normal for thousands of people is celebrated in Antarctica: The first sunrise after months of darkness. The return of the light is also the start for an important Antarctic summer season for New Zealand as it signifies 60-years since the construction of Sir Edmund Hillary’s Trans-Antarctic Expedition Hut, the original Scott Base.

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Melting ice sheet could expose frozen Cold War-era waste

Climate change is threatening to expose hazardous waste at an abandoned camp thought to be buried forever in the Greenland Ice Sheet, new research has found. Camp Century, a United States military base built within the Greenland ice sheet in 1959, doubled as a top-secret site for testing the feasibility of deploying nuclear missiles during the Cold War. When the camp was decommissioned in 1967, its infrastructure and waste were abandoned

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Antarctic sea ice may be a mercury source in the food web

New research has found methylmercury -- a potent neurotoxin - in sea ice in the Southern Ocean. The results are the first to show that sea-ice bacteria can change mercury into methylmercury, a more toxic form that can contaminate the marine environment, including fish and birds.

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Last mammoths on Alaskan island went extinct due to lack of water

A remnant population of woolly mammoths on a remote Alaska island was likely pushed to extinction by rising sea levels and a lack of access to fresh water, according to a newly published study.

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Extensive training for doctors bound for Antarctica

Living and working in the remote areas of Antarctica is not only fun and excitement, but also risky and dangerous at times. Medical services are far and basic and medical practitioners need a lot of various skills to ensure adequate service. Recently, five Australian Antarctic Division doctors have undertaken an eight-day Winter Expedition Medicine course at Bronte Park, Tasmania.

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Visit penguin and co via scheduled flight

Until now, most expeditions for tourists into the Antarctic used ships to visit penguins and massive icebergs. But now, a new way to travel, which had been reserved for station and scientific personnel will be available also for tourists: regular scheduled flights to Antarctica.

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Researchers successfully simulate sea ice leads in the Arctic Ocean

Scientists from the Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) and the University of Hamburg have succeeded in realistically simulating the emergence of large channels in the Artic sea ice in a computer model. Two approaches were decisive for this success: On the one hand, the researchers had increased the spatial resolution of the FESOM AWI sea-ice ocean model. On the other hand, they were able to improve the numerical solution to the equation so that the simulation of the lead formation holds up well when compared to real sea-ice satellite data. They reported this success in a study that appeared online in the professional journal, Geophysical Research Letters.

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