The International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators (IAATO) reported its visitor numbers for the 2017-2018 Antarctic season at the start of its annual meeting in Newport, Rhode Island, USA. IAATO has been monitoring, analyzing and reporting trends since 1991 as part of its commitment to ‘leave only footprints’ through the effective self-management of its activities.

Antarctic tourism has flourished over the last decade. The fascinating magic of the Antarctic environment has captured thousands of people. To make sure that tourism in this fragile wilderness remains environmental friendly and sustainable, IAATO imposes strong regulation strategies on itself. Credit: Michael Wenger
Antarctic tourism has flourished over the last decade. The fascinating magic of the Antarctic environment has captured thousands of people. To make sure that tourism in this fragile wilderness remains environmental friendly and sustainable, IAATO imposes strong regulation strategies on itself. Credit: Michael Wenger

The upward trend in visitor numbers recorded since 2011/2012 continued in 2017-2018. The majority, 41,996, of visitors travelled by sea to Antarctica on vessels offering excursions ashore, representing a 16% increase compared to the previous year. Of these, 3,408 flew to the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Peninsula where they immediately boarded a vessel for onward travel. This sector, known as air/cruise, has increased (6%) compared to the previous season. In addition, 9,131 visitors experienced Antarctica on one of four cruise-only vessels that do not make landings, an increase of 22% since 2016-2017. 580 visitors flew to field camps in Antarctica’s interior with IAATO land operators. Overall, the total number of Antarctic visitors in 2017-2018 was 51,707, an increase of 17% compared to the previous season. All visitor activities follow strict codes of conduct developed by IAATO and through the Antarctic Treaty System.

Places like the Subantarctic island of South Georgia are highlights Antarctic voyages. A strict set of regulations and management plans ensure that Antarctic wildlife is undisturbed and enhance the Antarctic experience for every visitor. Credit: Michael Wenger
Places like the Subantarctic island of South Georgia are highlights Antarctic voyages. A strict set of regulations and management plans ensure that Antarctic wildlife is undisturbed and enhance the Antarctic experience for every visitor. Credit: Michael Wenger

Overall American visitors remained the most numerous, accounting for 33% of the total number, the same proportion as the previous year. Chinese visitors were the second most numerous, accounting for 16% of all visitors and increasing by 4 percentage points compared to 2016-2017. Australian, German and British visitors were the next most enthusiastic visitor nationalities, accounting for 11%, 7% and 7% respectively. IAATO’s Executive Director, Dr. Damon Stanwell-Smith, added, “Visiting Antarctica is a privilege that comes with a responsibility to leave it pristine. The growth reported by IAATO mirrors a global upward trend in visiting remote places. Increasing evidence shows that these travelers want to tread lightly on the places they visit. IAATO operators are equipped with the knowledge and tools they need to operate responsibly and deliver strong conservation messages to their guests who we hope will return home as ambassadors for its preservation.” IAATO will present its latest figures at the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting in Buenos Aires, 13-18 May 2018, to facilitate discussions on effectively managing human activity in Antarctica.

The IAATO consists of operators and other stakeholders connected to Antarctic tourism. Every year, the association comes together to discuss and decide on ways to ensure an environmental and sustainable tourism to the last true wilderness on Earth. It is led by a dedicated secretariat (here together with AECO) Credit: IAATO
The IAATO consists of operators and other stakeholders connected to Antarctic tourism. Every year, the association comes together to discuss and decide on ways to ensure an environmental and sustainable tourism to the last true wilderness on Earth. It is led by a dedicated secretariat (here together with AECO) Credit: IAATO

Source: IAATO