Tsunami hits West Greenland coast

Since 2004, tsunamis have received a much bigger attention after several of these big waves had hit coastal areas in Asia killing more than 200‘000 people. However, these waves are not bound to the tropical or subtropical areas. On Saturday, June 17th, waves had struck the western coast of Greenland, causing havoc and destruction and presumably leaving four people dead.

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How the salt got into the Arctic Ocean

The Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic. With the help of a climate model, researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute have demonstrated how this process took place, allowing us for the first time to understand more accurately how Atlantic circulation as we know it today came about. The results of the study have now been published in the journal Nature Communications.

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Scientific expedition to explore the Arctic underwater world

Despite the warming of the Arctic Ocean, vast areas are still covered with ice and hides an unknown world from scientific research. With the ice retreating, this world can be investigated and previously inaccessible parts of the Arctic open up and maybe reveal new life forms. A French expedition named “Under The Pole III” will try to fill this gap on a three-year expedition around the globe.

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Large-scale AWI-expedition to investigate climate change in the Arctic

On May 24th 2017, 49 atmospheric and cloud researchers, sea-ice physicists, marine biologists and biogeochemists embarked on a joint expedition headed for Svalbard. On board the research vessel Polarstern from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) all of these disciplines are focused on just one question: How is the climate changing the Arctic? At the same time, the AWI research aircraft Polar 5 and Polar 6, launching from Longyearbyen (Svalbard), will engage in atmospheric measurement flights.

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First footage on feeding behavior of narwhals in Canada

Narwhals are amongst the most mysterious marine mammals known. Although the species has been known for centuries and has been exploited by humans, only little is known about their ecology. Especially the tusk has spurred human fantasy. Now, Canadian fisheries researchers were able to show by video footage for the very first time that narwhal bulls use their tusks for fishing.

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Arctic tourism organizations launch visitor guidelines for Arctic communities

Five Arctic tourism organizations have joined forces to develop guidelines for tourists visiting Arctic communities. In addition to general advice on how to behave, the organizations presented a tool that allows communities create their own tailored guidelines.

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How warming oceans impact Greenland‘s ice sheet

The mass loss of the Greenlandic ice sheet accounts for more than a quarter of global sea level rise. Scientists anxiously observe the increasing impact of climate change on the entire ice sheet.

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New research ships plans show cooperation between economics and ecology

It is said that economics and ecology seldom go hand in hand. However, Norwegian entrepreneur Kjell Inge Røkke and his family present a perfect example to prove the general opinion wrong.  Røkke has revealed plans for a brand new ice-strengthened research expedition vessel REV which will be built in cooperation with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). According to the plans, the yet unnamed ship will be ready in 2020 to set sail.

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Numerous icebergs drift along coast of Newfoundland

The coastline of Newfoundland in eastern Canada has received increased attention due to a large number of unexpected visitors. For weeks, a larger than usual amount of icebergs and drifting sea ice has been washed up along the shores of the islands. For tourists and locals alike, the bergs and ice pose a spectacular photo motive while sailors and International Ice Patrol worry about the impact on shipping lanes and marine traffic.

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Russia’s latest military base opens its doors

The Franz-Josef-Land archipelago is the northernmost landmass and is part of Motherland Russia. Considered as the western gateway into the Northeast Passage as well as to the North Pole, it is strategically important to the government in Moscow. With the renewed interest in the Arctic and its resources by Russia, authorities had made the establishment of a military base on one of the archipelago’s islands the highest priority. Now, after 3 years of construction, the complex at Nagurskoye Base on Aleksandra Island has opened its doors and was visited by president Putin and a high profile delegation.

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