Moulting bowhead whales in Nunavut

Bowhead whales are one of the most elusive and mysterious whale species in the Arctic, despite its size. Hunted almost to extinction, these huge baleen whales have made a tremendous comeback and are found now in many Arctic areas close to the ice edge. Now, researcher from the University of British Columbia have found a new and surprising behavior of bowheads in Nunavut, Canada.

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Belugas move from halibut to capelin in warming waters

Climate change seems to be driving a tiny fish species northward as Arctic waters grow warmer thanks to climate change — and they're getting gobbled up by whales that would normally find larger fish more tantalizing. But not only whales are after that tiny prey, also fish that used to be on the whale’s menu profit from the new resource.

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Svalbard reindeer is doing well

The Norwegian Polar Institute counted 1374 Svalbard reindeer in the Adventdalen around Longyearbyen this year. Many calves were observed and only a few dead reindeer found. This is a trend that has been observed for years: The reindeer population has been growing slightly in this region for years.

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First footage on feeding behavior of narwhals in Canada

Narwhals are amongst the most mysterious marine mammals known. Although the species has been known for centuries and has been exploited by humans, only little is known about their ecology. Especially the tusk has spurred human fantasy. Now, Canadian fisheries researchers were able to show by video footage for the very first time that narwhal bulls use their tusks for fishing.

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Gene flow between bear species is easier than expected

The mixing or hybridization between polar and brown bears appears to be easier than previously expected. Senckenberg scientists have sequenced the entire genomes of four bear species, making it now possible to analyze the evolutionary history of all bears at the genome level. It shows that gene flow, or gene exchange, between species by extensive hybridization, is possible between most bear species - not only polar and brown bear. The DNA samples of different bear species came from different European zoos, underlining their importance not only for conservation, but also for research. The study published today in "Nature Scientific Reports" also questions the existing species concept in general, because other genome studies too have, frequently found gene flow among species.

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Leap of faith: Why guillemot chicks take their jumps

Being a young guillemot chick is quite hard. Growing up on a small ledge on high cliffs in the Arctic, surrounded by thousands of birds, being prey for gulls, foxes and even polar bears is quite stressful. But even worse, the little ones have to jump down into the water before their wings can support them for flight. This behavior has puzzled scientists for a long time. Now, an answer may have been found.

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Svalbards reindeers keep shrinking

Svalbard is like the entire Arctic in a nutshell. Especially, reindeer, which are often portrayed as pulling Santa's sleigh, are an iconic species. The Svalbard reindeer is smaller and more sturdy than the average mainland reindeer. Now, ecologists have found that exactly these Svalbard reindeer are shrinking due to the impact of climate change on their food supplies.

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Grey whales in Russian Far East slowly recovering

The critically endangered western gray whale population that feeds in Russia's Far East waters is slowly showing signs of recovery, but their numbers and range are still at risk from industry activity in the region, according to a new report. Over the last 12 years, Sakhalin Energy has made important efforts to limit the impact of its operations on whales and the fragile environment. During this period, the western gray whale population has grown 3-4% annually, from an estimated 115 animals in 2004 to 174 in 2015.

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More grolars or pizzlies could roam the Arctic in the future

A couple of weeks ago in Arviat, Nunavut (CA), a local Inuit was out to hunt polar bears. However, what he had hunted was not an ordinary polar bear but a polar bear – grizzly hybrid. This is the third confirmed sighting of this hybrid and scientists now debate over the future of polar bears in the face of climate change.

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Eat now, pay later: Delayed effects of warming Arctic observed in migrating bird species

Red knots are an amazing bird species that migrate more than 5’000 km each season. From their breeding grounds on the Taimyr Peninsula in Russian Siberia they fly down south as far as Mauretania and even Australia and New Zealand. Due to the warming of the Arctic, the birds are becoming smaller. A new study now shows that the price for this shrinkage is not due until they arrive at their winter homes in the south.

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