Arctic explorer Roald Amundsen's former ship raised to surface

After six years of hard work, a team of Norwegians has succeeded in pulling the Maud - a ship that once belonged to famed Arctic explorer Roald Amundsen - from its icy grave in Nunavut waters near Cambridge Bay in Canada. The ship has been lifted to the surface and is now being preparing for winter before it can be brought back home to Norway

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Franklins long lost HMS Terror found in the Northwest Passage

When Sir John Franklin and his 128 men vanished without a trace in the Canadian Arctic in 1845, it led to the biggest and longest search and rescue missions in the history of polar exploration. More than 50 years, numerous ships and explorers made their way into the high north to look for the expedition and simultaneously for a passage through the Canadian Archipelago. The passage eventually was found, but the expedition and its two ships remained lost for almost two centuries. Until 2014, when the HMS Erebus, Franklin’s flag ship was found. Now, another search party also found the second ship, HMS Terror… almost 100 km south of its presumed sinking spot and perfectly intact.

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Melting ice sheet could expose frozen Cold War-era waste

Climate change is threatening to expose hazardous waste at an abandoned camp thought to be buried forever in the Greenland Ice Sheet, new research has found. Camp Century, a United States military base built within the Greenland ice sheet in 1959, doubled as a top-secret site for testing the feasibility of deploying nuclear missiles during the Cold War. When the camp was decommissioned in 1967, its infrastructure and waste were abandoned

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Last mammoths on Alaskan island went extinct due to lack of water

A remnant population of woolly mammoths on a remote Alaska island was likely pushed to extinction by rising sea levels and a lack of access to fresh water, according to a newly published study.

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Diaries of Alfred Wegener’s first expedition published

Alfred Wegener is considered one of the most prominent and most influential European polar researchers. Especially his expeditions to Greenland brought him fame even amongst the Danish community. Now, his diaries of his first Greenland expedition 1906 – 08 have been published. A specialty of the publication are the 70 hand-drawn sketches which were digitally re-mastered with great care. Dr. Reinhard Krause added explanatory comments to the publication.

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90 years ago - Amundsen crosses the North Pole with the airship “Norge”

The inaccessibility of the Poles always challenged ambitious men of the early 20th century to risky expeditions. With the dawn of airplanes at the same time, it only was a matter of time until some daredevil would use the new technology for exploration purposes.

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Wreckage of lost US-whaling fleet found off the Arctic coast of Alaska

NOAA archaeologists have discovered the battered hulls of two 1800s whaling ships nearly 144 years after they and 31 others sank off the Arctic coast of Alaska in one of the planet's most unexplored ocean regions.

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Dead men do tell tales: Archaeologists ‘solve’ mysterious death on Bjørnøya

Some people presume interesting things and treasure to be buried on islands. For a team of scientists, this holds true on Bjørnøya, a small island halfway between mainland Norway and Svalbard. There, archaeologists have unearthed a grave with the skeleton of a young man at Nordhamna.

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John Franklin’s ships bell found in the Arctic

Few expeditions are shrouded with more mysteries than the Arctic expedition by British Royal Navy officer and explorer John Franklin who set out in search of the Northwest Passage. When ice trapped his two ships all 129 men were lost. Recently one of the ships the HMS Erebuswas found nearly 170 years after the ill-fated expedition. Divers have now recovered a bronze bell from the wreck.

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